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In case you missed the top 5 Design Engineering stories of last month: Cybersecurity risk of 3D Printing and more...

  • 2 min read
We decided to collect what we thought were are some of the best design engineering-related articles published in July and feature them in this roundup.


The cybersecurity risks of 3D printing 


team of cybersecurity and materials engineers from NYU Tandon School of Engineering are exploring some of the implications of using 3D printing in a global supply chain. Specifically, they examined two potentially serious security issues — printing orientation and insertion of fine defects — where hackers could impact an end product’s quality, leading to product recalls and lawsuits.






Robotic exoskeleton glove gives operators super gripping strength 



Have you ever wished you had super-sonic gripping strength? Wearable technology that enhances gripping strength has been around for years. However, General Motors is partnering with Swedish-based medtech company Bioservo Technologies to further develop a robotic exoskeleton glove for use in industrial applications.










New titanium gold alloy four times harder than most steels 

Physicists at Rice University have published a study on a new titanium and gold alloythat is not only significantly harder than most grades of steal as well as titanium alone, but also wear-resistant and highly bio-compatible.


Crystal structure of beta titanium-3 gold (image credit: Rice University)



Mars Rover gets one step closer to 2020 launch 


NASA is ready to proceed with the final design and construction for its next Mars rover project. The space agency has competed an extensive review process and the rover has passed a major development milestone.


This image is from computer-assisted-design work on the Mars 2020 rover.  Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech




Giant Canadian exoskeleton to make hydraulically powered, anti-automation statement 


When complete, "Prosthesis: the anti-robot" will require a human inside to pilot its two-story-tall, 3000kg frame.


Photo courtesy of Prothesis: Anti-Robot.